Categories
BLOG

cbd oil legal in virginia

Is CBD oil legal in Virginia?

Copy article link to clipboard.

Link copied to clipboard.

Contents

  1. What is CBD?
  2. Why is CBD sometimes illegal?
  3. Virginia CBD laws
  4. Where can I buy CBD in Virginia?
  5. How to read CBD labels and packaging

Yes, to a certain extent. However, it’s a little more complicated than a simple yes or no.

The Hemp Farming Act of 2018 legalized all industrial hemp and products made from industrial hemp containing no more than .3% THC. These products include oils, tinctures, topicals, and even certain infused edible products, as well. The US Department of Agriculture are in charge of maintaining rules and regulations regarding safety and quality standards. The US Food and Drug Administration will still maintain authority over the addition of hemp-derived CBD to food products, as well as the marketing and regulation of CBD labeling and therapeutic claims.

What is CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in both cannabis and hemp plants. After tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), it is the most abundant compound found in cannabis plants, although CBD derived from hemp usually only contains trace amounts of THC, less than .3% by legal definition. CBD is known to have many potential therapeutic benefits, including anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-anxiety, and seizure-suppressing properties.

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating substance found in cannabis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Image lightbox

CBD is the yang to THC’s yin; it halts anxiety and elevates your level of chill without intoxication.

Combine THC and CBD to fully employ the entourage effect; THC and CBD work hand-in-hand to amplify each others’ effects.

What does CBD stand for? Cannabidiol.

Why is CBD sometimes illegal?

The 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA) created a schedule of various drugs that are considered illegal, and their respective potential for abuse and addiction, as well as any medicinal benefits. Under the CSA, all forms of the plant cannabis sativa, including hemp, were classified as a Schedule I controlled substance, which defined cannabis as a substance with a high potential for abuse, no medicinal benefits, and a likelihood for addiction.

The Hemp Farming Act of 2018 legalized the cultivation and production of hemp, altering the definition of hemp to create a separate, legal pathway for hemp to be removed from the Schedule I category. Hemp is now defined as cannabis containing no more than .3%THC by weight, while marijuana is defined as cannabis containing more than .3% THC. Hemp-derived CBD was declassified from the Controlled Substances Act through the passage of the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, but CBD derived from the marijuana plant is still considered a Schedule I controlled substance and is still illegal at a federal level.

The Hemp Farming Act of 2018 also preserved the rights of the US Food and Drug Administration to maintain authority over the CBD labeling, therapeutic claims, and the use of CBD as a food additive. The FDA has taken a firm stance against allowing hemp CBD to be added to food or beverage products, while also maintaining that CBD should not be advertised as a dietary supplement. They are in the process of re-evaluating the regulations on hemp-derived CBD products. However, they have yet to lay out specific regulations prohibiting such measures, leading to a great deal of confusion in the market. In July of 2019, the FDA issued a warning letter to hemp CBD company, Curaleaf, outlining the various ways the company was violating regulations.

Thus, even hemp-derived CBD remains heavily regulated by the federal government. Another stipulation of the Hemp Farming Act of 2018 is that each state is allowed to make their own specific rules and regulations regarding the sales and distribution of hemp-derived CBD products, and state jurisdictions retain the right to restrict or prohibit the cultivation and commerce of hemp products. In addition, states may attempt to regulate food, beverages, dietary supplements, and cosmetic products containing hemp CBD, regardless of the final rules laid out by the FDA.

Virginia CBD laws

Although Virginia has always had very strict laws regarding marijuana, there has long been interest in hemp in Virginia. In 1997, Virginia passed House Joint Resolution 565, which allowed for a six member joint subcommittee to study the economic benefits of, and barriers to, the production of industrial hemp in Virginia.

After the success of HJ 656, in 1999, HJ 94 was passed to memorialize the Secretary of Agriculture, the Director of the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy to permit the controlled experimental cultivation of industrial hemp in Virginia. This was effectively a legal loophole, as federal law restricted the cultivation of hemp at the time, but by placing federal agencies in control of the program, cultivation was permitted with restrictions.

As it slowly became clear that hemp could be an economic boon for the rural communities in Virginia, the state made more moves to further the cultivation and production of hemp. In 2001, HJ 605 requested that the Commission on Rural Prosperity consider the cultivation of hemp as a means to promote rural prosperity.

As it slowly became clear that hemp could be an economic boon for the rural communities in Virginia, the state made more moves to further the cultivation and production of hemp. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Image lightbox

In 2015, Governor Terry McAuliffe signed Senate Bill 955 into law. SB 955 created a university-run research program and sought to redefine hemp as the plant cannabis sativa with a concentration of THC no more than .3% as allowed under federal law. The bill also directed the Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to draft the relevant rules and regulations for the program and to give higher institutions the authority to establish industrial hemp cultivation programs.

Over the next few years, more legislation was introduced to further define the newly established industrial hemp cultivation program. In 2016, House Bill 699 clarified several aspects of the program: that no person with a license may be prosecuted for the cultivation, manufacturing, processing, sales, or distribution of industrial hemp products, and authorized the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services to adopt regulations for a licensing program.

In 2018, House Bill 532 was passed to further lift restrictions on the industrial hemp cultivation program, but lacked the necessary compliance with the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, so it was swiftly followed up by Senate Bill 247, which replaced the current licensing system, ensuring that Virginia was in compliance with the Hemp Farming Act.

Virginia’s Plan to Regulate Hemp Production was submitted on January 15, 2020, and is currently under review by the USDA,

Virginia Licensing Requirements

To legally possess hemp plants, hemp seeds, hemp microgreens, hemp leaves or hemp flowers in the state of Virginia, you must be a registered Industrial Hemp Grower, Dealer, or Processor, or an agent affiliated with the registrant for the purposes of growing, dealing, or processing hemp.

The registrations expire within one year of being issued, and must be renewed annually.

The Industrial Hemp Grower Application both to start and for each renewal costs $50. A registered Industrial Hemp Grower is required to submit a planting report within 14 days of planting seeds, clones, or cuttings. If you plant multiple times throughout the growing season, you will need to submit multiple planting reports.

If you are planning to add or change field locations, you will also need to submit an Industrial Hemp Registration Change Form.

To become an Industrial Hemp Dealer, you must submit an Industrial Hemp Dealer Registration Application. This is necessary for anyone who plans to buy and sell industrial hemp to a person who processes industrial hemp.

To become an Industrial Hemp Processor, you must submit an Industrial Hemp Processor Application. With this license, you may purchase industrial hemp from a licensed Hemp Dealer, and process it into hemp products.

Registered Growers, Dealers, and Processors may submit an “Agent Documentation” form for each agent working closely with industrial hemp, but this is not a requirement for the program. This is for documentation purposes and to avoid any legal difficulty.

For any other questions related to registration, the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services offers an Industrial Hemp Registration Guide.

Virginia CBD possession limits

Virginia has a limited CBD and THCA law that allows for qualified patients to possess CBD or THCA oil that contains at least 15% CBD and THCA and no more than 5% THC in total. Any processed form of cannabis, aside from whole flower is permitted, and there is no limit on the amount allowed for possession. Although this law was initially written only for patients with epilepsy, the law was expanded in 2019 to permit any medical conditions with a written certification from their doctor. Applications to become a certified patient are available on the Virginia Department of Health Professionals website.

Any processed form of cannabis, aside from whole flower is permitted in Virginia. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Image lightbox

There is no limit on the amount of hemp-derived CBD that may be possessed in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Where can I buy CBD in Virginia?

CBD and THCA oil is available from five certified Pharmaceutical Processors.

Before the passage of the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, you needed an Industrial Hemp Grower, Dealer, or Processor License, to possess any hemp-derived CBD products.

However, since the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, the Virginia Division of Legislative Services issued a brief explaining that hemp-derived CBD products are now legal in all fifty states and may be purchased at any standard brick-and-mortar store, or online without restriction.

How to read CBD labels and packaging

When purchasing hemp CBD products, one of the most important first steps to determine if this is a reputable source for high quality CBD is to examine the lab report and certificate of analysis, which is usually available on the label and packaging of the product. Most reputable hemp CBD companies will include the following information on the label:

  • Amount of active CBD per serving
  • Supplement Fact panel, including other ingredients
  • Net weight
  • Manufacturer or distributor name
  • Suggested use
  • Whether the product is full-spectrum, broad-spectrum, or isolate
  • Batch number or date code

One of the most important things to pay attention to is whether a CBD product is full spectrum, broad spectrum, or isolate.

Full spectrum means that the CBD has been extracted from a hemp plant along with all other cannabinoids and terpenes, including whatever trace amounts of THC the plant may have produced. Consuming full-spectrum CBD may yield better results thanks to the entourage effect, a phenomenon in which the mixture of cannabinoids and terpenes work together to produce a more pleasant experience.

Broad spectrum means that the product contains CBD and terpenes, but has undergone additional processes to strip out any THC.

CBD isolate is a product that has gone through more intensive processing to remove everything except for CBD. Consuming isolate may produce different effects than full-spectrum or broad-spectrum CBD, as these products do not produce the entourage effect.

Is CBD oil legal in Virginia? Copy article link to clipboard. Link copied to clipboard. Contents What is CBD? Why is CBD sometimes illegal? Virginia CBD laws Where

Virginia Gov. Signs Bill to Regulate CBD Products as Food

“It gives validity to the CBD industry,” one Virginia farmer said

By Jeffrey Knight Of Capital News Service • Published April 17, 2020 • Updated on April 17, 2020 at 7:02 am

Gov. Ralph Northam recently signed a bill that would define hemp extract, such as CBD, as food and usher in state regulations on these products.

Senate Bill 918, patroned by Sen. David Marsden, D-Fairfax, will help guide the budding industrial hemp industry in Virginia by regulating facility conditions and requirements for the production of hemp-derived products intended for human consumption.

This bill also allows the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to regulate and enforce certain standards for hemp extract, including labeling requirements, identifying contaminants and batch testing.

Local

Maryland Senate OKs $1.5B Virus Relief Package With Direct Payments

Joint Base Andrews Breach Triggers Broad Security Review

Charlotte Wright, a hemp farmer based in Brunswick County and owner of the CBD business Hemp Queenz, said she feels encouraged by Marsden’s bill.

“It gives validity to the CBD industry,” Wright said. “Right now, there is no testing required, no labeling, you have no idea what is in it. It’s like the Wild West.”

However, Wright is worried about the federal law and said keeping to that level of THC makes it difficult to produce competitive CBD products.

Hemp plants can not exceed THC levels of 0.3% or they must be destroyed, which complies with federal standards. THC is the intoxicating component in marijuana. CBD, also found in marijuana and hemp plants, does not cause a high and is used for a wide variety of treatments from anxiety to pain relief, according to a report from the World Health Organization.

The hemp plant produces significantly low THC levels and high CBD levels, according to the WHO report. Hemp, a relative of the marijuana plant, is used for a variety of things from making fibers to beauty products. CBD also has various applications; it can be used for edibles, oils and oral supplements.

“If we go over the limit, we have wasted all of our time and money,” Wright said. “It is ridiculous to argue over seven-tenths of a percent when any hemp farmer can easily grow a crop that is under 1% total THC. You can’t easily grow a crop that is under 0.3%.”

Wright said the longer the hemp plant grows, the more CBD and THC it produces. A higher CBD percentage will make the product more valuable.

“To get those relevant CBD percentages up over 13% or 14%, you have to leave it in longer, the longer you leave the plant in the ground, that THC number creeps up,” Wright said. “After all is said and done, that seven-tenths of a percent isn’t going to impair anyone anyway.”

Since the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp has been removed from the definition of marijuana and taken out of the Controlled Substances Act. Hemp can currently be grown, processed and distributed by licensed individuals in most states.

However, under the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, it is illegal to add CBD or hemp products to food or market them as a dietary supplement.

Currently, the only pharmaceutical drug containing CBD that has been approved by the FDA is Epidiolex, which treats two rare, severe forms of epilepsy in young children. There are no over-the-counter CBD products that are approved by the FDA.

“If the FDA does not start approving CBD products people are going to take them without regulation,” said Kyle Shreve, executive director of the Virginia Agribusiness Council. “That’s what the bill says, we are going to treat them like they are approved by the FDA so we can start regulating them.”

Shreve said it’s important to add another viable cash crop for agribusiness in the state.

“Right now we are losing tobacco and dairy farms in the commonwealth, so it is another opportunity for Virginia producers to diversify and grow something that would help sustain their business,” Shreve said.

During the 2019 growing season, approximately 1,200 registered industrial hemp growers planted around 2,200 acres of hemp in Virginia, according to Erin Williams, VDACS senior policy analyst. As of April 10, there were 1,280 active industrial hemp grower registrations, 357 processor and 219 dealer registrations.

“I think it has a strong future,” Marsden said about the hemp industry in Virginia. “We just need to regulate it and hold other states to our standards.”

Marsden said over-the-counter CBD products like those sold at gas stations or convenience stores might not have CBD in them at all and could contain harmful ingredients.

“We can’t have inferior products coming in from other states,” Marsden said. “We are going to try to do a good job with this stuff and it is up to VDACS to make sure other states don’t ruin our market with crap.”

Three bills were signed by the governor recently regulating industrial hemp in Virginia. One of those bills, House Bill 962, introduced by Del. Daniel Marshall III, R-Danville, regulates smokable hemp products for those over 21 and allows the sale of these products in vending machines.

The governor also approved SB 1015 which protects certain people involved with the state’s medical cannabis program expected to begin this year. SB 2 and HB 972 decriminalize possession of certain amounts of marijuana and allows for the expungement of a prior misdemeanor offense. Northam recommended changes to the decriminalization bill that would still need to be approved when lawmakers reconvene on April 22. One recommendation is to move the deadline for a legislation study back to 2021 and another proposes that a marijuana violation occurring during the operation of a commercial vehicle would be included on the driver’s Department of Motor Vehicles record.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam recently signed a bill that would define hemp extract, such as CBD, as food and usher in state regulations on these products