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7 of Oregon’s Best CBD Products & Where to Find Them

There are moments when getting high is just what the doctor ordered—and in those cases, there’s plenty of flower, extracts, and edibles with a little THC (or, let’s be real… a lot) that will do the trick.

But there are also moments when getting high isn’t the end goal—when you’re looking for some pain relief, relaxation, or help falling asleep without any of the euphoric effects you’d get from THC. And in those moments, there’s nothing better than CBD.

Thanks to Oregon’s cannabis-centric culture, companies are cranking out some of the best CBD-based products in the country. Here are just seven of Oregon’s very best.

Strawberry CBD Gummies by WYLD

(Courtesy of Wyld)

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WYLD makes Oregon’s bestselling edibles—and they hit it out of the park with their Strawberry CBD Gummies, the brand’s only exclusively CBD product. A 12-count box of these tangy chews are infused with fresh Oregon-grown strawberries and 100mg of CBD, offering plenty of pain-relief and relaxation benefits—perfect for unwinding after a long week.

Chocolate Relief Square by Serra x Woodblock Chocolate

(Courtesy of Serra)

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If you want your CBD packaged in some of the best chocolate you’ll ever taste, check out the Relief Square from Serra and Woodblock Chocolate. These dark chocolate and sea salt chocolate bars are made from a micro-lot of cacao beans from Trinidad—meaning that the only place you’ll be able to taste this chocolate (which has flavors of fig, marshmallow, raspberry, and pepper) is in this bar. Each bar contains nine 5mg-servings of CBD—just make sure to pace yourself, as they also contain THC (2.5mg per serving).

Topical Relief Oil by Empower

(Courtesy of Empower)

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Empower’s line of body products are incredible for anyone who struggles with pain or sore muscles (their company tagline is “Put it where it hurts”), and their Topical Relief Oil is definitely the standout of the bunch.

A blend of CBD, carrier, and essential oils (including Jojoba, bergamot, and Oregon lavender), this topical relief oil soothes sore muscles, relaxes the body, and delivers both anti-inflammatory and aromatherapy benefits that leave you feeling both stress and pain-free. And because Empower only uses the highest-quality carrier and essential oils, you don’t have to worry about any potentially negative side effects with your skin.

“Two Flowers” CBD-Infused IPA by Coalition Brewing

(Courtesy of Coalition Brewing Co.)

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Beer and cannabis. Does it get any better? Well, it does if you can have both at the same time.

Coalition Brewing set out to create a product that highlights the similarities between cannabis and hops—and the result is Two Flowers, a CBD-infused India Pale Ale. Each pint of this IPA, which is available at Coalition Brewing’s Southeast Portland brewery and in various taprooms in the Portland area, is infused with roughly 3mg of CBD. Not only does it provide a mellowing effect (which have been described as “having a few beers in a hot tub”), but it may also help your body process the alcohol more effectively and protect it from liver damage .

CBD Lemon Sparkling Water by Ablis

(Courtesy of Ablis)

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If you’d prefer your CBD-infused beverage to be less “let’s grab a beer” and more “let’s grab a water,” give the Lemon Sparkling Water from Bend-based Ablis a shot.

This sparkling water/CBD cocktail, which is made with organic lemon and preservative-free, packs a solid 25mg of CBD into each bottle. The flavor is light and refreshing, as a sparkling water should be. If you want to get a bit more adventurous with your flavors, Ablis also offers two other sparkling beverage flavors: blood orange and lemon ginger.

CBD Anti-Inflammatory Pain Stick by Sacred Herb Medicinals

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Kaleafa in Beaverton, OR

The Anti-Inflammatory Pain Stick from Sacred Herb Medicinals—which blends CBD with a combination of herbs, essential oils, waxes, and butters—is significantly less messy than your traditional oil or lotion, making it a great option for when you need pain relief on the go. This product is especially helpful for athletes—throw one in your bag on your next run and rub the stick over your skin when that inevitable soreness starts to kick in.

Dark Chocolate Sea Salt CBD Bar by Grön

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Portland-based chocolatier Grön’s award-winning chocolates have a cult following in Oregon—and their Dark Chocolate Sea Salt CBD Bar is one of their best. The chocolate bar—which is made with Fair Trade cacao beans and hand-harvest pure flake sea salt—is infused with 50mg of CBD (or 5mg per serving). If you consider yourself a chocolate snob, this is the CBD product for you.

Need some relaxation or pain relief? Whether you're looking for yummy gummies or a soothing topical, these CBD products will do the trick!

Is CBD oil legal in Oregon?

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Contents

  1. What is CBD?
  2. Why is CBD sometimes illegal?
  3. Oregon CBD laws
  4. Where to buy CBD in Oregon
  5. How to read CBD labels and packaging

Yes, cannabidiol (CBD) oil is legal in Oregon, a pioneer when it comes to cannabis legalization.

Oregonians legalized medical cannabis in 1998 with the passing of Measure 67, the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act. The legalization of recreational cannabis followed in 2014, with the approval of Measure 91, the Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act.

As one of the most cannabis-friendly states in the nation, the Oregon cannabis rules for CBD are equally progressive. But as CBD — and the production of products including CBD oil — has become more widespread, states are putting stricter regulations on CBD.

What is CBD?

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. Unlike THC, CBD is non-intoxicating — so consumption of CBD won’t produce the same “high” as flower, edibles, or other cannabis products containing THC.

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating substance found in cannabis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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The second-most-abundant cannabinoid found in the plant after THC, CBD has a host of therapeutic benefits, including analgesic, anti-anxiety, anti-inflammatory, and seizure-suppressing properties. CBD can be sourced from marijuana or hemp plants.

Why is CBD sometimes illegal?

Hemp strains don’t produce enough THC to cause intoxication, yet all cannabis — including hemp — was considered illegal under the 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act. Under this law, cannabis was categorized as a Schedule 1 drug, defined as a substance with a high abuse potential, no accepted medical use, and a likelihood for addiction.

The 2018 Farm Bill legalized hemp cultivation and made the plant an agricultural commodity. It also removed some forms of cannabis from the Schedule 1 category by defining a legal threshold between hemp and marijuana. Hemp is now defined as cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC by weight and is no longer a Schedule 1 substance. Marijuana is now defined as cannabis that contains more than 0.3% THC by weight. However, marijuana-derived CBD is still considered a Schedule 1 substance — and is still federally illegal, even though states have ruled differently.

To meet federal legal criteria, CBD oil must contain no more than 0.3 percent THC. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Hemp must still be produced and sold under the regulations outlined under the bill. To date, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has yet to create these regulations.

While the Farm Bill did preserve certain regulations surrounding CBD — including the power of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to regulate CBD’s labeling, therapeutic claims, and its use as a food additive. Under current FDA regulations, even hemp-derived CBD may not be added to food or beverages or marketed as a dietary supplement. The FDA has begun the process of reevaluating that stance, but the agency hasn’t provided definitive answers about how it will revise the current regulations. The FDA has been strict about CBD health claims and content that could be construed as medical advice. In July 2019, the FDA issued a warning letter to CBD producer Curaleaf for making unproven health claims.. Three months earlier, the FDA warned three other CBD makers for making similar health claims.

Current federal laws still highly regulate the production and sale of hemp and its cannabinoids, including CBD. In addition, the Farm Bill also allows states to regulate or prohibit CBD cultivation and commerce. In addition, states also may attempt to regulate CBD beverage, food, dietary supplement, and cosmetic products independently of the FDA finalizing its regulations around such products.

Currently, Oregon is theWest Coast state where CBD in food and beverages can be purchased from retailers, including pharmacies and grocery stores.

Oregon CBD laws

Under Oregon state laws, cannabis — including CBD — has been legal recreationally and medically since 2014. That means that in Oregon, both hemp-derived and marijuana-derived CBD were already legal at the state level prior to the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill. However, in some aspects, it follows federal law.

Oregon currently follows the same CBD classification regulations as outlined by the 2018 Farm Bill. Under the state’s current hemp program, businesses do not need to apply for any type of licensure or registration to sell CBD products, as long as they meet federal requirements, contain less than 0.3% THC, and aren’t advertised as a dietary supplement.

There are no restrictions on the sale of CBD products to individuals 21 and older, except for inhalant delivery systems and their components.

Licensing requirements for CBD

Currently, hemp-derived CBD products are overseen and regulated by the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA).

While there are no requirements surrounding the sale of hemp-derived CBD products in Oregon, there are regulations around testing, labeling, and cultivation that vary for hemp and marijuana products.

Oregon’s packaging and labeling restrictions require that if products contain only industrial hemp intended for human consumption or use, the label must include the department’s special hemp symbol, which is a white cannabis leaf and the word hemp inside a rectangle with a blue background. If the products contain any marijuana as defined by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC), the state’s cannabis regulatory body, they must bear the universal symbol, a rectangle with a white cannabis leaf and an exclamation point inside a rectangle with a red background.

  • The labels on CBD products must include this warning: “This product is derived from hemp and could contain THC. Keep out of reach of children.”
  • Manufacturers also must also include the following FDA statement: “This product is not approved by the FDA to treat, cure, or prevent any disease.”
  • If the item is a hemp extract, concentrate, topical, or a hemp product other than an edible, tincture, or capsule, the label needs to contain the warning, “Do Not Eat” in bold, all-capital letters.
  • Current testing requirements state that extracts or concentrates for retail must be tested for pesticides, solvents (if used), and THC and CBD content.
  • Cannabinoid hemp products meant for human consumption must be tested for THC and CBD content.
  • Under current Oregon laws, there are no minimums or maximums for growing hemp after a grower’s application is approved. Oregon residents without an approved registration may grow up to four cannabis plants — including hemp.

Oregon CBD possession limits

There are no possession limits for hemp-derived CBD in the state of Oregon. For CBD that is derived from marijuana, possession limits vary by product type. The limits are 16 ounces (456grams) of marijuana in a solid product form, and 72 ounces (2,052grams) of marijuana in liquid product form, and 5 grams of concentrates.

There are no possession limits for hemp-derived CBD in the state of Oregon. For CB marijuana-derived CBD, possession limits vary by product type. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Where to buy CBD in Oregon

Because hemp-derived CBD products including CBD oil are now federally legal, consumers have a wide variety of options online or in retail stores for purchasing CBD in Oregon.

How to read CBD labels and packaging

When purchasing CBD oil and other products, make sure the label clearly defines the contents. Most reputable CBD producers will typically include the following information on their CBD product labels:

  • The amount of active CBD per serving.
  • Supplement Fact panel, including other ingredients.
  • Net weight.
  • Manufacturer or distributor name.
  • Suggested use.
  • Full spectrum, broad spectrum, or isolate
  • Batch or date code.
  • Oregon’s hemp and/or universal symbol.

Is CBD oil legal in Oregon? Copy article link to clipboard. Link copied to clipboard. Contents What is CBD? Why is CBD sometimes illegal? Oregon CBD laws Where to buy